Meet LaDante Weems—a formerly incarcerated youth and now graduate of the AJAC Juvenile Rehabilitation Manufacturing Academy program—tells his story on becoming a full-time employee at Tech Marine. We at AJAC are so proud of how far LaDante has come since his incarnation and wish him nothing but continued success in his future.

The Aerospace Joint Apprenticeship Committee (AJAC) recently partnered with the Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership (WRTP) on a multi-state effort to encourage more women to enter into technical apprenticeship programs. WRTP was recently awarded a federal Department of Labor grant to support the Raise Women’s Success in Apprenticeships (RWSA) network of multiple non-profits, Workforce Investment Boards, employers, and unions from the West Coast and Great Lakes regions who are building capacity to better engage women in apprenticeship pathways and help them succeed.

 

Ebonee Heller, the winner of 2019 Tradeswoman of the Year, graduated the AJAC apprenticeship in June.

 

The program will provide services and inform potential apprentices in multiple big market cities, such as Oakland, Seattle, Milwaukee, Twin Cities, and Detroit.

Washington State has 7,972 active apprentices, but of these only 1,654 are women, a notable 10% (data which also includes women-dominant occupations such as cosmetology). The formation of the group will allow women to gain access to opportunities in various male-dominant occupations, such as manufacturing, energy, IT and transportation.

RWSA seeks to build a learning network committed to sharing best practices that not only help recruit more women into apprenticeship pathways, but more effectively leverage available public resources that can help women succeed, such as provisionary training, tutoring, and connections to supportive services such as childcare and transportation. This support system will be invaluable to women as they prepare to enter fields where they have not historically been represented.

The systemic change anticipated to result from the partnership is planned to be transformational. RWSA will bring together networks that normally work separately but with similar goals: meeting workforce needs and helping underrepresented and low-income peoples gain access to better careers.

Learn more about the new initiative through one of our partners Wisconsin Regional Training Partnership (WRTP).

Take a tour of Machinist Inc in Seattle, Washington as the Aerospace Joint Apprenticeship Committee (AJAC) and Hazen High School (Renton School District) celebrate National Manufacturing Day (MFG Day) 2019. Students from Hazen High School received an insiders look at the products made by Machinists Inc and highlight the economic importance of manufacturing and draw attention to rewarding careers in the industry.

About MFG Day: There is an increasing demand for highly skilled professionals in the manufacturing sector who can design, program and operate technology. Over the next decade, manufacturers will need to fill 4.6 million jobs. Organized by The Manufacturing Institute—the education and workforce partner of the National Association of Manufacturers—MFG Day is designed to introduce young people and others in the community to the thriving manufacturing industry to change perceptions of manufacturing and highlight the high-tech and innovative companies that are solving tomorrow’s challenges today. More information is available at www.mfgday.com.

About Machinists Inc: Since 1941, Machinists Inc. of Seattle provides ISO 9001 certified metal fabrication, welding, CNC Machining, finishing, and assembly. They operate the largest precision machining shop in the Northwest and provide composite tooling, integrated systems, engineering, aerospace tooling, fabrication and welding, shaft turning, large machining, horizontal boring, 5-axis machining, inspection, finishing, and logistics. More information is available at https://www.machinistsinc.com/.

 

The Wells Fargo Foundation, established in the U.S. as a registered 501(c)(3) charitable organization in 1980, is the company’s primary philanthropic funding arm. In 2018, the foundation donated nearly half a billion dollars to 11,000 nonprofit organizations, including the Aerospace Joint Apprenticeship Committee (AJAC).

AJAC is also a non-profit 501(c)(3) that provides registered apprenticeship training to adult workers and high school youth, and a pre-apprenticeship training program (Manufacturing Academy), which prepares job seekers for employment and apprenticeship opportunities across the state of Washington in the aerospace and advanced manufacturing industries. Students who enroll in AJAC’s Manufacturing Academy (MA) are looking to kick start their future by attaining a full-time job and continued career training through AJAC’s available apprenticeship programs leading to sustainable income, and some semblance of financial freedom. A new partnership between Wells Fargo and AJAC provides more than just manufacturing training to help students get closer to their goals.

Dwight J. Prevo, Vice President of Wells Fargo’s Community Relations West Region, spoke about the importance of learning financial literacy skills, especially for individuals starting new career paths. Prevo states, “As the majority of AJAC participants will start career opportunities that provide wages, providing financial education is a way to ensure that recipients of the instruction understand how money works, and how to effectively utilize money as a way to accomplish their short and long term objectives.”\

 

 

Local Wells Fargo team members use the Wells Fargo At WorkSM program to help AJAC apprentices establish healthy financial habits and achieve greater financial stability and success. The program also allows students to participate in financial health webinars and conversations with a phone banker on topics like budgeting, saving, or strengthening credit. Wells Fargo’s free, non-commercial Hands on Banking program is an additional resource with a bevy of interactive financial wellness courses. Students enrolled in MA will receive the one-hour training twice a month for the duration of the program and learn skills ranging from basic finance to managing more advanced financial resources. Zuleima Flores, a summer graduate from AJAC’s Kent Manufacturing Academy, explained the class “was a great time to reflect on pursuing a career and one day owning my own home.”

Lynn Strickland, Executive Director of AJAC, feels a responsibility for educators to take students future into consideration, “AJAC’s goal is to help people prepare for a prosperous future and through our partnership with Wells Fargo, students will now be more prepared to make healthy financial decisions on their pathway to apprenticeship.”

 

 

Please welcome our first intern since 2014, Eytan Raphaely! Eytan studied marketing communications at the University of Washington and recently graduated this past June. His role at AJAC will focus on helping the marketing department with a wide variety of projects including social media, newsletter, storytelling, outreach and website development. Eytan will also assist the Youth Apprenticeship department during their recruitment in the winter and spring.

What’s the best part of your job so far?

The best part of my new job has been meeting all the new people. I’ve only known the people around the office for a few days but I can honestly say these are some of the kindest and most knowledgeable people I know.

What is your favorite part about working in the non-profit industry?

My favorite part of working at a non-profit is knowing that my job directly influences changing people’s lives for the better.

 If you could live in a book, a TV show or movie, what would it be?

I would live in the world of Avatar: The Last Airbender. If you don’t know, it’s one of the best shows ever created and should be required viewing in all homes across the world.

What do you like to do outside of work?

 Most days I like to unwind from work by playing basketball, reading, playing video games or writing.

Which celebrity do you get mistaken for?

People tell me I look like a mix between Pete Davidson and Francisco Lachowoski.